How Do I Invoice For My Freelance Writing Work? With Sample

by Anne Wayman

I hate to admit it, but I don’t really know how to invoice  or ask for pay for my freelance writing work. The whole subject of writing and money scares me half to death, partly, I’m sure because I don’t know what I’m doing.

Help!

Thanks,

WL

Hi WL

Thanks for asking and please, don’t feel alone. We have a whole category here on Money Issues and getting comfortable the billing clients you write for is simply part of running your freelance writing business.

When it comes to creating an invoice for writing work you’ve done you need these things:

A copy of the contract, which may be just an email, that describes the scope of the work, how much you’ll be paid, and the terms of that payment.

The number of hours you’ve worked if you’re being paid by the hour. I use Toggl.com to track my time – it’s free.

Specifics on how the pay is to be delivered – your Paypal address or your mailing address if it’s a check, etc.

Your name and contact information.

If you don’t have all this information, just do the best you can and make sure you get set up so this info is available in the future.

Then you assemble this information into an invoice. I generally use a Word and as you’ll see below, I keep it really simple:

invoice for writers

Everything’s here – the date, who it’s for, what I did, how much time it took, directions on how to pay me, a thanks and my sig. Note too that I’ve added US to the $150 per hour because this client is not in the United States, and I want U.S. dollars. PayPal will do that – I’m just reminding the client.

This got emailed and pay arrived shortly.

I could have added a ‘due on receipt’ notice and even something like ‘a 10 percent late charge will be added on over due payments,’ and sometimes I do that, but not in this case – I’ve been working with this client long enough to know I don’t have those issues.

Recently, for people like this, I’ve been using PayPal’s invoicing system… super easy after you read the instructions and all the client has to do to pay you is click on a link. Plus you’ve got a record there at PayPal.

If the kind of writing you do requires lots of invoices you may want to invest in some invoicing software. I’ve heard good things about FreshBooks and they have you can try FreshBooks free for 30 days.

What’s your take on invoicing for the writing work you do? How do you invoice? Tell us in comments.

[sig]

Share this with your network – it helps me build traffic and get the word out – thanks!

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Cathy Miller September 20, 2013 at 6:02 am

I have used an Excel worksheet since I started. I know there are all kinds of services that do it for you, but frankly I don’t find it that difficult.

I have one spreadsheet that records my billing.

Name of Client – Description of Project – Invoice # – Fee – Status – Date Billed – Date Received

I created the Invoice # by starting with my 1st client as #1 and the 1st project as #1. Most of my projects have a 50% deposit so that would be payment #1 and the balance paid would be #2.

Example
XYZ Company-Deposit on White Paper-#1-1-1-$XXXX-Billed-9/20/2013-(Rec’d Date to be filled in)
XYZ Company-Balance on White Paper-#1-1-2-$XXXX-Pending – (Rec’d Date to be filled in)

I created an invoice template that has my Business name and Employer ID# on the left, the Invoice #, date billed, name of contact & client name & address on the right.

Underneath that I have the date range for the project, project description, and the fee. I have a total at the bottom with a red arrow that says Pay this amount pointing to the amount due. I offer payment info (PayPal or check made payable to me & my address).

Done. :-)
Cathy Miller recently posted..When Business Writing Examples Go Too FarMy Profile

Reply

annew September 20, 2013 at 8:58 am

Good way to organize them and track them, Cathy.

Reply

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv badge

Previous post:

Next post: