13 Reasons Why Writers Should Blog

in Blogs, Etc. Helpful Freelance Writers

Freelance writers start a blogBy Marcie Hill who blogs at Marcie Writes.

If you are a writer, you should have a blog. A blog is an online representation of you and your writing, which will allow people to get to know you better personally and professionally.

You can use it to document your knowledge, skills and your experiences.

It can also help to brand you as a writing expert in your favorite genres.

Following are 13 more reasons why writers should blog:

  1.  Get read by more people.  As you know, the purpose of writing is to get read.  Blogs give you access to a worldwide reading audience.  Your online fan base can easily expand to international countries with a little creativity in your promotion strategies.
  2. Get feedback.  Be warned – this feedback could be positive or negative depending on the person delivering it.  Use this information to improve your stories; develop different angles on topics; and start new topics.  Also, you will find yourself growing a “thick skin,” which will help you professionally and personally.
  3. More visibility and credibility.  The more often people see you, the more they will trust and follow you.  This consistency lends to your credibility.  People will get to know you, your style of writing, and your dedication to your craft.
  4. More creativity. While writing allows you to paint pictures with words, blogs allow you to add images, videos and audio to really add life to your stories.  Or, you can use these multimedia tools to tell your story.
  5. Sometimes you just feel like writing. Blogs are online journals, so this is the perfect place to express your thoughts.  They don’t have to be related to the theme or topic of your site, but they should be uniquely you.
  6. More freedom.  You have the freedom to say what you want, how you want and when you want on your site. There are limitations when you work for others as employees or freelancers.
  7. Become an expert and resource. Blogging will make you both depending on the topics you share and the information you give.  As long as you provide original content on your topic and add value to your readers, they will return. They may even bring others with them.
  8. Your blog could serve as your website. As independent professionals, writers should have an online presence.  To not be online is to have an invisible enterprise.  Blogs are a cost-effective and easy way to develop and maintain that presence.

  9. Promote your work and report your progress, challenges and successes.  Keep others abreast of what’s going on with your projects. If you are writing a book, document your journey to completion, including the challenges and successes.  Journalists can report their newest stories or announce experts they are seeking.  Grant writers may gain new clients based on the information they share.  Writers of fiction may gain new fans.  Sharing such information could bring unexpected resources your way.
  10. Develop a consistent writing schedule. Although blogging is very time consuming, you should come up with a consistent weekly schedule that you can realistically stick with.  This consistency will help build your credibility because your visitors are checking you out to see how well you do and how often you do it.
  11. Publish unpublished works. Not all of your written successes will be accepted by publishers and magazines. Instead of letting disappointment set in, put your works on your blog. They will at least be read by your audience.  The feedback provided will help you turn your work into something greater. Just because it wasn’t accepted initially doesn’t mean it won’t be accepted at all.  And, you never know who’s reading who could help you get your work published.
  12. Write your book. There is a book in all of us and blogs are a way to write them.  Your genre doesn’t matter.  Unless you actually start a blog to write a book, this option would not immediately occur to you.  However, as you continue to write, you will find certain themes and topics that recur. It is at that time you will have a light bulb moment. You will also have a purpose and focus in your writing.
  13. Attribution Some rights reserved by Annie Mole. People of all professions and interests are visiting your site and you just never know who’s live you are impacting or who could impact yours.  Be sure to respond to all comments and to give love to the people who give love to you.

Above are 13 reasons why I think writers in all genres should blog.  You will not only gain credibility as a writer, but you have another outlet for expression and an additional tool for building fans.  Most importantly, your time and commitment invested will eventually result in profits.

Tell us why or why not you’ve started a blog.

Marcie Hill is a professional journalist, blogger, and live blogger. She turned her loves into The Write Design Company where she provides social media community management services and training. Find Marcie at http://marciewrites.wordpress.com and on Twitter @Marcie_Hill.

Two newsletters:
Abundant Freelance Writing - a resource for freelance writers including 3x a week job postings.
Writing With Vision - for those who want to get a book written.

Image: Attribution Some rights reserved by Annie Mole

{ 22 comments… read them below or add one }

Stephanie July 11, 2012 at 10:13 am

Great article, all of the information is so true, and even gave me some ideas for my own blog! I’d like to add a number 14 and 15 to the list though as a writer-turned-blogger:
14. I love being my own boss and being in charge of my hours and content.
15. There actually is really good money in blogging, if you find the right kind of advertisers for your blogs’ niche. I just found a company called Mobicow at http://www.Mobicow.com that turns all of my site traffic into revenue and lets you keep 60% of net income. And this makes me want to add another one to the list…
16. My time is worth something!

Reply

annew July 13, 2012 at 9:36 am

Nice additions!

Reply

HP van Duuren June 27, 2012 at 1:29 am

Thanks for this post Marcie,

I have my blog for many similar reasons as listed in your post. I also like to make my Blogposts into actual Online Conversations and get Readers Feedback. On my
– Writer’s Lifestyle - blog I also actually have a special page with Short Stories in Developement to be able to get an idea about what you as a reader think about them,

Only since you currently don’t yet seem to be giving any readers feedback, I do think that this Silence is enough Feedback to conclude that I might better focus on some of the other things I am currently also doing on that blog, like for example (pre) Selling the - Writer’s Kit - with Practical Products for writers, and offering all kind
of other Practical Resources and for example writing about how you can use a Blog
as a – Platform – to Work From.
HP van Duuren recently posted..Your Blog As a – Platform – To Work FromMy Profile

Reply

Serena Wadhwa September 6, 2011 at 9:35 am

Marcie, thanks for sharing this. I like the idea of “publishing” unpublished work! It’s a nice way to keep consistent with a writing schedule.

Reply

Marcie September 30, 2011 at 1:01 am

Serena, blogs are a great place to put work that will has not been accepted. You can also us the information to review and re-submit.
Marcie recently posted..Phenomenal Woman by Kenneth WorthingtonMy Profile

Reply

Anne September 30, 2011 at 11:34 am

Excellent tip Marcie – thanks.

Reply

Serena Wadhwa September 6, 2011 at 9:34 am

What useful tips! I like the idea of “publishing” your unpublished work on your blog. That’s a great idea. Thanks!

Reply

Anne September 7, 2011 at 10:12 am

What publishing actually means has expanded hasn’t it?

Reply

Mary T. Wagner September 5, 2011 at 3:14 pm

Yes indeed, I’m quite happy that I started blogging a few years ago, pushed by friends to return to creative writing in a way that legal briefs just weren’t satisfying. WHO KNEW that I’d turn my essays into three separate published essay collections? WHO KNEW how much fun and connection and adventure would follow by virtue of the fact that I had a single place to park all of my essays on random subjects? It rapidly provided me with an instant “platform” from which to branch out, enter contests, develop a track record as a public speaker, and just let the words come out naturally, knowing that “pitching” an editor was no longer an impediment for writing for the joy of it and sharing with others. And one of the joys is that, after youve published your post and decide that some part of your prose was clunkier than it should be…YOU CAN GO BACK AND MAKE IT BETTER!

Reply

Anne September 7, 2011 at 10:06 am

Good for you Mary.

Reply

Valerie Hamer September 2, 2011 at 10:07 am

This is a really useful article for me, thanks. I’m only a month in and am getting some decent stats re views and comments. However I already feel the need to get a bit more organised and find a definite direction. Your site is a great resource.

Reply

Anne September 2, 2011 at 10:52 am

Valerie, getting more organized seems to go on constantly… and so does refining direction or vision.

Reply

Kim Davies September 1, 2011 at 8:38 am

Hi Marcie! Yep, smashing post :)
I’m not the writer in our family, my hubby is- but i write a blog about what it’s like to be a writers wife…a quite different slant on things! xx

Reply

Marcie September 5, 2011 at 2:39 pm

That is a different slant to the blogging. How are things going with that?
Marcie recently posted..Happy Labor Day from MarcieMy Profile

Reply

Jennifer Brown Banks August 31, 2011 at 8:51 am

Marcie,

Interesting read. Thanks for sharing these tips. I agree with the reader who stated that you should exercise prudence in what you publish, however. :-) Keeping in mind that readers have the potential of being future clients as well.
Jennifer Brown Banks recently posted..What I’m Reading… and You Should Too!My Profile

Reply

Marcie September 5, 2011 at 2:38 pm

It is for that reason “I encourage everyone to use wisdom in what they choose to say and the topics they want to speak on. “

Reply

Marcie August 30, 2011 at 7:52 pm

Nicky, nice to meet you, too. I’m glad you enjoyed the list! Also, is there a way I can sign up to receive e-mail updates from your site?
Marcie recently posted..Marcie’s Top 10 “Must Read” Black History BooksMy Profile

Reply

Feekoningin August 30, 2011 at 12:16 pm

As a professional writer and editor who has evaluated people and their work, I have one note of caution. Though this list advocates putting everything out there, I totally disagree. Though writing and the First Amendment are about a profusion of voices and thought, the reality is that the person assessing you for a freelance or permanent job as a writer is only human, complete with his or her own prejudices. And so are the readers. I am considered a very open person and was praised when I was young because I wrote about being multiracial in a way that was contrary to the way “society” said I was. Many people congratulated me on being “courageous.” I never felt endangered, and I already had the job. But the reaction of others let me know that I was skating on thin ice and that things could have gone wrong for me. There are certain things I reveal very selectively because we don’t really live in a society where there is a broad respect for differences of lifestyle or opinion. Unless you plan on becoming an activist, be careful about the positions you take online because you can’t unring a bell.

Reply

Anne August 30, 2011 at 2:39 pm

I’m so sorry that writing about being multiracial caused problems… we’ve still got so far to go on the issues of race.

Reply

Marcie August 30, 2011 at 7:48 pm

Feekoningin, this list does not advocate putting everything out there. As with any social media tool, I encourage everyone to use wisdom in what they choose to say and the topics they want to speak on.

I agree that you cannot control the reactions of others; however, we can’t live our lives based on the opinions of others if we intend to go far in what we want to do. That’s why I am not as far in my writing life as I could be.

On the other hand, if you are looking to brand yourself as a writer, a blog is probably the best tool to do that. You only tell people what you want them to know about you as a person and a writer. And people will gather around you because they like you as a person or the content you provide.

Yes, the world is reading. But you never know who is reading. And they are looking at your writing style, the quality of work, the consistency of publishing, and other value you can bring to their projects. And, sending links to stories you have written on YOUR blog may add to your credibility.
Marcie recently posted..Marcie’s Top 10 “Must Read” Black History BooksMy Profile

Reply

Anne September 1, 2011 at 12:57 pm

Well said Marcie.

Reply

Nicky Parry August 30, 2011 at 8:34 am

Great list, Marcie. We hear over and over again thse days how a blog is the new resume. I think that’s just becoming increasingly true as the world becomes more digital by the day. Nice to meet you!
Nicky Parry recently posted..Of Pets And PeanutsMy Profile

Reply

Leave a Comment

CommentLuv badge

Previous post:

Next post: